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Hey friend, I'm Katie.

Walking, talking, and
Mexican food enthusiast.
Friend who believes
your whole soul matters.
Homemaker & Writer.

Let's go for a walk?

The Breathtaking “Why” Behind Making a Home

The Breathtaking “Why” Behind Making a Home

Meander through the 24-hour cycle of bodily functions and repeat ad nauseam.

What exactly is my job in this house? I could tell you a lot about what homemaking is not. But what homemaking is? Who on earth is telling me that?

Where professions are concerned, the work we do is a reflection of the imago dei, the image of God designed in each one of us, so it helps to trace the theme of home from Genesis to Revelation. 

The first home was perfect: God and man together in a garden. He walked among them, all was bliss, “and the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed.” (Genesis 2:25) All were fully known and fully loved. 

But sin breaks home precisely when it breaks communion with God. “…the LORD God sent him out from the garden of Eden to work the ground from which he was taken.” (Genesis 3:23)

Yet time and again the Lord describes Himself as refuge and shelter, and He’s always looking for the place where His glory will dwell. “You shall not defile the land in which you live, in the midst of which I dwell, for I the Lord dwell in the midst of the people of Israel.” (Numbers 35:34)

Until. Until “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us.” (John 1:14) Until God Himself put on skin and became homeless and told us God’s heart was always about welcoming the prodigal home, sharing His presence with those who never left (Luke 15). 

And when He had defeated death, walked out of the grave, and ascended to heaven, He sent His Spirit to live inside each of us, so that our bodies become “temple[s] of the Holy Spirit within [us], whom [we] have from God.” (1 Corinthians 6:19) We are now His ambassadors, outposts of the presence of God multiplying over the full face of the planet.

And finally, on the Last Day, He will make all things new, revealing the dwelling place He has promised us. “And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God…’” (Revelation 21:2-3)

At long last, God and man will once again share Home. No longer a garden for God and one couple, but a gleaming, garden city for the people He has rescued to Himself. Our true Home, Jesus, will reign forever, wiping away every tear from every eye that was ever caused by our separation from Him. Under the blood of the Lamb, all will be fully known and fully loved, once more.

Jesus gave His life to be our HomeMaker, to make a way for us to once again belong with the holy God. 

True home is where we are fully accepted in the presence of God, a place only accessible by the blood of His Son, and a gift freely offered through the Spirit of God. 

If Jesus is both our true Home and our HomeMaker, and if I am a homemaker until He is finally revealed, who does that make me today, really? 

Home*maker:
one who cultivates intimate belonging by tending souls and spaces, such that all who enter are both fully known and fully loved.

Friends, this is our hard and holy calling today. Tempting as it is to wrap our homemaking around chores or children, ultimate reality points us elsewhere. Homemaking is primarily about enjoying the presence of Jesus and preparing His way to the hearts of others.

We’ll be fleshing this out in the weeks ahead, finding ways to make this extraordinary truth tangible right in the midst of holy ordinariness. 

But for today, can we start by lifting up our heads and hearts? May they be set on Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of our faith. May we ponder Him who died to make a Home for us, even as we give our lives to make a home for others.

How We Walk: An Invitation to the Mom Who Wants to Do More than "Stay"

How We Walk: An Invitation to the Mom Who Wants to Do More than "Stay"

I Love Doing Dishes, But That’s Not What Makes Me a Home Maker

I Love Doing Dishes, But That’s Not What Makes Me a Home Maker